Sex Is Not the Problem (Lust Is)

I’m not usually ashamed of being a Christian and reading Christian books in public, but I have to say, I didn’t take this book outside my house. I really don’t like the book title and much prefer its previous title: Not Even a Hint. Why did they (whoever it was) change the title?

Sex Is Not the Problem (Lust Is)However, apart from the title, this book is great and very helpful. It has been on my bookshelf untouched since 2011. I know the exact date because a good friend from Uni gave it to me as a gift for my engagement (why?) and she wrote a short message and the date on the first page. I don’t usually read books given by people because I only read books I choose to read (I know that statement is slightly problematic), so I never opened it until the beginning of this year when I did a bookcase “spring clean”. It ended in my to-read pile (you totally need to see the size of the piles now after Word Alive, photos to come in April Miscellany. Absolutely shocking!).

The book is by Joshua Harris, who is the author of the well-known I Kissed Dating Goodbye and Boy meets Girl. (Just to show how popular these two books are: I had extra copies of them to give out to young friends. But I never managed to give them out, because everybody has read them already!)

What struck me most about this book is the honesty of the author. I had some idea about this from reading the two relationship/courtship books mentioned above, but I was still very impressed with him sharing the experience and struggles over various stages of his life.

(Right, enough rambles.) Why is lust a problem? Because what it perverts is too good to miss. The book first sets the impossible standard of “not even a hint of sexual immorality” (Ephesians 5:3), leaving readers despairing about the “mission impossible”. It then borrows C. S. Lewis’ story of red lizard (in The Great Divorce) to illustrate the point that the problem of lust can only be solved, not by setting rules, but by replacing the “pleasure” of lust with a greater pleasure. It’s so true when C. S. Lewis said, “you are way too easily pleased (by earthly things)!” when heavenly things are unimaginably better.

It then talks about a few subjects specifically with more details, for example, different struggles of men and women, temptations from media, accountability and how to fight with the Sword of Truth.

Last of all, back to the title of the book. If you decide to take the book out for the sake of conversation opportunities, I’m very interested to know how it goes.

 

 

 

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